Friday, January 19, 2018

~~ A Post on a Post ~~

A post on a post? Why not? 
You won't want to miss this post . . . I didn't!
Find out why I went dumpster diving for a little piece of history. 


It all started when contractors started to demo an old house on our block.


The housing market in Denver has exploded recently and many of these lovely small bungalows 
are being scraped down to the ground or are popping their tops to add more square footage. 

The next few photos are about five minutes walk from our house in an old neighborhood. 
Such a dramatic change. 


Usually,  a modern structure that doesn't fit with the character of our old neighborhoods 
is hastily constructed where a lovely little bungalow once stood. 
Or a block of cracker-box "slot" condos that house too many people, increasing traffic 
and taking up limited parking spots, changes the vibe of these turn-of-the-century streets. 


It makes me sad to see the character of our historic city being overly-modernized,
especially when it happens on my street. 
These boxy condos are everywhere you look. 
How'd you like to live right next to the new lite-rail/noisy freeway?


So, back to my story.
This pretty Victorian on our street that was being demoed had lovely stained-glass windows 
and white columns on the front porch supporting a balcony. 
We kept an eye on the pillars the workers had leaned up against the house. 
I have been known to "rescue" alley finds 
but I restrain myself from actually taking anything from someone's property.


Then came the day when an enormous truck arrived to remove the full construction dumpster. 
I watched out my front window as the truck backed up to hook onto the dumpster.  
That's when I saw a white column sticking out of the top of the dumpster. 
I called Ron and we rushed outside and approached the workers in front of the house.


"Could we have that white post in the dumpster please?" we asked politely.

"Sure, but make it quick before he drives off."

We ran to the truck driver and asked if we could have a minute to rescue the column. 
He nodded and said the boss had told him to wait while we got it. Such a nice bossman!

So, we tugged and pulled until we were able to remove the pillar from the dumpster, 
thanked the driver, and scurried home with our treasure.
I didn't know what I was going to do with it but not only was it part of our neighborhood history, 
it was chippy and white and I loved it. I knew I'd find a home for it somewhere. 


Ron set about removing rusty nails from the top.


Inside, I tried it here and there and finally found the perfect spot for it in my "attic" office.


The top piece of the post was missing so I put an old plate on top 
and nestled a spider plant on it in front of the window.


That plant has a fun story as well. We were leaving an estate sale and saw a man loading a big spider plant into the back of his truck. That's when I saw a baby spider get torn from the mother plant. 
After he left, I ran over and retrieved the little baby from the sidewalk. 
I plopped her into a glass of water when we got home and she immediately grew some healthy roots. Now she's potted atop my rescued post and sending out more babies.


So, this story ends well for everyone.
The orphaned spider plant has a home, the rescued post adds a dilapidated grandeur to my office,
and the history of our old neighborhood has been preserved.

The End (or is it?)

44 comments:

  1. Good save! Too bad you couldn't have the stained-glass windows.

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    1. Thank you! I'm keeping my eyes open for neighborhood scrape-offs. Who knows what I'll find in a dumpster! Hugs, Pat

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  2. I am so glad you rescued that post and re-purposed it beautifully.

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  3. Sorry about your neighborhood being so changed. Glad you were able to rescue the post. It is lovely and just wait til that spider plant takes off. The post looks great in your room.

    Happy curbside shopping and dumpster diving.

    FlowerLady

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  4. My church is in a historic neighborhood, and my guess from experience is that those windows sold well. I am so glad you got a great save out of this deal. Love the plant story!

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    1. Thank you Penney! Don't you just love beautiful old windows and architectural salvage? Hugs, Pat

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  5. A post about a post. Now that's funny! Good for you for saving that beautiful piece of history. I would have done the same thing.

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    1. Thanks Jill. I've been so pleased to see all the favorable comments about saving this old post. Hugs, Pat

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  6. I absolutely enjoyed every word in this post . . . how wonderful that you watched and recused that pillar, then gave it a place of honor in your home. People don't seem to be able to see the beautiful in old architecture until someone like yourself comes along and gives it a new purpose. It is a crying shame how many wonderful things get sent to the dump.
    Just a little reminder, if you haven't entered my Give-A-Way, please do so.
    I will be posting a winner tomorrow.
    Happy dumpster diving.
    Connie:)

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    1. Hi Connie! So glad you enjoyed this post. I'm glad to hear from others who value these old bits of history. Have a great week. Hugs, Pat

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  7. What a great story Sister. The post was a great find and looks so good in your office. The little spider plant looks happy too.

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    1. Thanks Jan! Hopefully I won't kill the plant! You're the one with the green thumb! Hugs, Pat

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  8. Way to go, Pat! Big score, but oh, so sad what's happening everywhere. I am happy (okay, mixed feelings) to say my daughter and her husband just bought a 1917 home in our historic East End (closed today!). It's turning into an artsy neighborhood, revitalizing among the inner city dwellings. I'm hoping the best for them, and happy to see many of the older homes here being restored and updated.

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    1. Hi Rita! Your daughter's neighborhood sounds wonderful. I wish all developers could see the beauty and reasons for saving these old homes. At least, one post at a time! Hugs, Pat

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  9. Good for you Pat! I guess they couldn't make the apartments look like the rest of the historic area. At least you did your part to preserve this old piece, i love that.

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    1. Hi Marlene! There are some new buildings (condos) in Denver that look like there right out of old Paris but it costs a lot more to do that so I guess these boxes are how they make money. I love sitting here at my desk and admiring my old post. Have a good week. Hugs, Pat

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  10. Hahaha! That's fantastic!! Usually they don't let you take stuff like that even when you ask so you definitely scored big time! The biggest thing I ever got was a 6 foot piece of wrought iron fencing a neighbor put by the curb. It was only 5 houses away but it took me and my hubby a long time to take it a few steps, set it down, take a few more until we got it home. It's on the side of my house and in the summer I have morning glories climbing all over it.

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    1. Thanks so much Lauren. Loved your story about the heavy fencing. I'd love to get my hands on some of that too! It must be glorious with morning glories on it. Makes me wish for summer! Hugs, Pat

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  11. That is so cool! I'm glad you can enjoy a piece of the past headed for a landfill, no doubt. I'm with you on the tearing up old neighborhoods for "progressive" rehab. SAD.

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    1. Thanks Mary! Too bad we can't go "diving" in the landfills for old goodies, huh? Hope you have a great week. Hugs, Pat

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  12. Nice find! The Lego block homes currently in vogue in the metro area have taken fugly to a whole new low. Bless you for preserving some of the Queen City's best.

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  13. What a treasure! And you found the perfect spot for it!

    Hugs,
    Rebecca

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    1. Thank you Rebecca! I wish you a lovely week. Hugs, Pat

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  14. Oh yay!! What a fabulous find. :)

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  15. OOOH! I can't wait until you find the base and capital to add to your plundered post!!! What a great story and yes, it makes me SICK to see beautiful old homes torn down when they could be sold and moved so their story could go on... In the mid-1960's my father was stationed in Boulder, Colorado while he attended law school at the University of Boulder. We lived in a beautiful 1909 Queen Anne and I still remember the layout of this house although I was aged 4 - 5 1/2 years old when we moved from there to Concord, Massachusetts with Daddy's next posting with the USAF. I've been in-love with old houses, porch posts, wicker furniture and the like ever since!!! Coming over from Life and Linda with Dishing and Digging It ~ happy to visit your site again! <3

    Great job rescuing your new-found post/friend,
    Barb :)

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    1. p.s. I pinned most of your photos to my boards via Tailwind! Love yours of you and your hubby! <3

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    2. Thanks Barbara! I enjoyed your story and appreciate your love of architecture. Thanks for hopping over from Dishing and Digging It. Hugs, Pat

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    3. Dumpster diving score! What a great find and fits perfect in your office...enjoy!

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  16. Loved your post on a post. You have a knack for story telling. Won't you come by for a visit?
    Laura of Harvest Lane Cottage

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    1. Hi Laura! Thanks so much for your sweet comments. As a frustrated novelist-wannabe, I'm thrilled you think I'm a good storyteller. Thank you. I'll visit soon. Hugs, Pat

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  17. I love how you rescued the post and created a whole new project for it. It is a shame to lose a piece of history.

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  18. Thank you Debra! So true. They only make them once! Have a wonderful weekend. Hugs, Pat

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  19. I love love love your rescued post! I have been want just such a post to put in my dining room. I have a rescue story posted today also.
    :) gwingal

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  20. Pat, I agree that Denver should not lose it's charm in exchange for these hastily built multifamily housing complexes. The Denver Highlands neighborhood was able to change zoning laws to stop older bungalows from being torn down, and I hope your neighborhood can do the same. It is sad to see history so hastily erased.

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  21. Pat, Good for you to save a bit of history. Those condos by the tracks have no personality in my humble opinion. Love the bright colored ones. Don't know that I would like to live there though. Thanks for sharing your spider plant story. Sylvia D.

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  22. Pat, I love your post about a post! I have a similar story, only around here you have to pay for them. I saw a home being demolished in a neighboring town that had three pillars. I went to it three times before I found anyone there. I bought all three. He charged me $50 each, but they go for about $200. They are in my garage right now. I thought I would use them on our she shed, but they were too large. I have one just like them that I bought years ago in my entry and I love it. Old pillars have such character, I think. I hate that similar housing is popping up around here as well. Thanks for sharing with SYC.
    hugs,
    Jann

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  23. Pat, Such a shame that the neighborhood is turning around with those condos. We live in a condo, also, but ours are nothing like those, plus we're semi in the country. Anyways, what a great post you found and I wanted to thank you for sharing this at Share Your Style.

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  24. It's great you rescued that piece of the neighborhood, but I can't help but wonder what special goodies were hidden and hauled off to the dump.

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  25. Hi. Just found your blog and your home is lovely. My daughter moved to Denver 9 years ago and just moved back to the Detroit area with her intended. They lived in a darling little house in Denver, but had to vacate because it was being torn down for one of those ugly condos that you have shown. They knew they could never afford a home of their own and didn't like what was happening with housing there. I'm happy she's back home and they've found a cute little house that they are renovating and love. It is so sad to see the decline of lovely older neighborhoods even though we live in the country. Take care.

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